Science Update: Bitter Taste Effects On The Airway

by Guido Masé November 17, 2016

5 Comments

Lungs_Physiology_For_Young_Ppl_1880s

Ever since discovering that bitter taste receptors are found in the airways1, we have been following this emerging area with an eye to how and why this is happening. Some of the initial research focused on cells that line our lung passages: these cells are covered in fine, small “hairs” called cilia which help to capture and eliminate harmful substances by constantly beating and pushing material up and out of the bronchial system. Scientists looked for genes in those cells that might have instructions for cell-surface receptors, to see if they were able to sense anything, and to their surprise discovered that these cilia-bearing lung cells had bitter taste receptors on their outside surface.

This in-and-of-itself was quite interesting, but what really surprised researchers a few years later was the discovery that, when stimulated, the bitter taste receptors in the lungs led to relaxation in airway smooth muscles, helping to keep lung passages open2. The apparent mechanism involves the cilia-bearing cells releasing a calcium-based signal into the local circulation which hyperpolarized the smooth muscle cells, making it harder for them to contract. Net result: dilation of the air passages.

It is becoming increasingly clear that our respiratory passages, from the nose to the lungs, are loaded with bitter taste receptors. Robert Lee and Noam Cohen at UPenn, for example, are researching bitter taste receptors in the sinus passages (where they apparently stimulate an innate immune response)3. This is part of a broader realization that bitter taste receptors don’t just protect us from poison, but also may protect us from pathogens seeking to gain a foothold in our airways (and GI tracts) by sensing bitter-tasting molecules that these pathogens produce. As a result, we are starting to take a broader view of bitter taste receptors as a more general protective, chemosensory mechanism that activates immunity, detoxification, and balanced metabolism4. Doctors Lee and Cohen even noticed, upon digging further, that individuals with mutations in the structure of their bitter taste receptors may be more likely to experience challenge in their airways5.

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Now, we have new research showing what occurs when those bitter taste receptors in the lungs are stimulated. Researchers in Spain discovered that, while there is overall airway dilation in response to bitter taste receptor stimulation, there is also a strong effect on the rate of beating and movement of the cilia cells that line our bronchial passages – in some cases, they become twice as active6. This means that not only are the lung passages more dilated, there is also an increased rate of what we call “insensible” expectoration: the body’s natural process of moving material up and out of the lungs.

Though researchers at UPenn are exploring what this mean for those who suffer from chronic sinusitis, it is still too early to make broad claims about the role of bitter plants in maintaining optimal airway health. But it is exciting to think that bitter plants may have a role to play in helping the airway to maintain a normal, relaxed tone and a healthy level of mucus clearance.

 

The post Science Update: Bitter Taste Effects On The Airway appeared first on Urban Moonshine.

Guido Masé
Guido Masé


5 Responses

Lexie Donovan
Lexie Donovan

December 15, 2016

Bitters are fine for children if you dose down according to their weight. The serving size on the bottle is for a 150 lb adult, so just divide your child’s weight by 150 and then multiply that by the serving size. Cheers!

Terry
Terry

November 29, 2016

Very well written!
Mind blowing stuff…will totally change my healing.

Vicki Kuskowski
Vicki Kuskowski

November 28, 2016

You will need to speak with your healthcare provider about adding bitters into your regime, but a good digestive bitters formula is a gentle way to support great intestinal health and help with things like occasional heartburn, gas, bloating, or bowel irregularity.

Sandra Mattson
Sandra Mattson

November 27, 2016

any possability of bitters helping after being treated for c-difficile for the first time?

Cindy
Cindy

November 20, 2016

I have been using digestive bitters for a year now and I have no more problems with my stomach issues.

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