Heartburn and Proton Pump Inhibitors: A Case Study in Drug-Like Mentality Science Update by Guido Masé, July 12, 2017

One of the big lessons I learned from studying medicinal plants is that, when a health concern isn’t an immediate emergency, it is better to focus on supporting the living human than trying to control one piece or another of the physiology.

So, for example, we use gentle infusions made with herbs like catnip and elderflower for children’s seasonal challenges instead of drugs that might reduce fever or suppress the secretion of mucus. It is often the case that over-the-counter and prescription medications, useful as they are, come at our bodies using a drug-like mentality: find the most obvious problem, and hit back at it hard. I can’t argue that this approach has been incredibly successful in a range of situations, notably acute infection, life-threatening autoimmune inflammation, shock, and acute cardiovascular events – but that doesn’t, by extension, mean that this drug-like mentality is the only approach, or that it should be the first approach in any given situation. In many cases, the herbalist’s approach of support over control makes a lot of sense.

Nowhere is this perhaps more clear than in the way we address occasional heartburn. There are a few options to choose from: regular antacids like Tums or bicarbonate, digestive bitters, H2 receptor blockers like Zantac, and proton pump inhibitors like Prilosec, to name just a few. The proton pump inhibitors are by far the most prescribed type of heartburn and acid reflux medication: in fact, these are the fourth top-selling prescription in the United States, with over 15 million monthly prescriptions.1 By some estimates, over 20% of the population is taking a […]

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Chamomile: A Popular Herb With A Strong Record Of Safety Science Update by Guido Masé, June 2, 2017

German chamomile (Matricaria recutita, also known as Matricaria chamomilla or Chamomilla recutita) is one of the best-known medicinal herbs in the world. Ivan Salamon, from the University of Presov in Slovakia, also calls it “one of the most well-documented,” and points to its use in the official dispensaries of over 26 countries.1 Dr. Salamon has spent much of his research career on this beautiful and delicate plant, documenting changes in its volatile oil profile in different growing environments,2 analyzing chamomile crops grown in the open in Slovakia for contamination (and found them to contain very low levels of heavy metals, pesticide and radioactivity residue),3 even helping to develop a specialized industrial-scale harvester for the flowers.4 In his review of the medicinal properties of chamomile, he notes its consistent popularity and effectiveness.

safety pregnancy chamomile Guido Masé

We think of chamomile flowers (the most active medicinal part) as […]

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Five Ways To Stop Your Sugar Cravings By Aisling Badger, May 24, 2017

eat too much sugar take bitters
sugar cravings stop with bitters

 

What happens if you eat too much sugar?

Sugar is a primary life source, and our bodies require it for energy. The body responds quickly to sugar as a fast-acting fuel. Complex sugars in whole foods offer a balanced response to sustaining our blood sugar as they are most often nutrient-rich, and the energy is obtained by breaking down these foods in our digestive process. Refined sugar is unnatural, and gets used quickly in the body as an efficient boost when we need it most, so sometimes it comes in handy. However, the more we count on it, the more our body craves and depends on it. Sugar also triggers the pleasure hormone, dopamine, which leaves us reaching for more as part of our reward and pleasure system.
While cravings can mean many things—including the need to strengthen the adrenal system, monthly hormonal changes, food sensitivities, etc.—cravings are also directly affected by our diet and lifestyle habits. When our blood sugar is low from lack of carbohydrates, protein or fat (the energy-producing nutrients, we crave sugar to keep ourselves going.
In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) sugar cravings are seen as a a sign of an underlying deficiency. Essentially, we are craving nourishment. Traditionally nourishing and building foods like rice, sweet potatoes, carrots, winter squash, dates, etc. are all sweet in flavor, but also healing and full of substantial nutritional value.

 

How to curb sugar cravings:

 

1. Stabilize your blood sugar

Not only will this support a healthy endocrine (hormonal) system, it takes away the need for sugar […]

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Stinging Nettle: The Unsung, Bristly Superfood Science Update by Guido Masé, May 16, 2017

Most herbalists know of the nutritive value of nettles (Urtica species). We harvest them in spring and early summer, cook them in soup, or dry them to make dark, rich overnight infusions that replenish and revitalize. I was first introduced to nettles when I was young, at my grandmother’s house where they grew wild. Since then I’ve found them growing almost everywhere: on the rocky slopesides of Vermont’s Smuggler’s Notch, in the lowlands by the lakeside, all across Europe and North America. But nowhere have I seen nettles like Urtica massaica, the species that grows near water in the highlands of Tanzania

nettle tanzania

We are working at a local hospital, on the edge of the Serengeti just west of the Rift Valley. This is the land of the Maasai, who herd cattle all day, generally eat meat and some grains (no vegetables), and live in far-flung bomas far from modern healthcare. This is generally fine – but in some cases, such as after protracted childbirth or long-standing illness, members of the community arrive at the hospital with profound anemia. We have routinely seen hemoglobin levels of 4, 5, and 6 – normal being 12 or 13 – and while some are lucky enough to receive blood transfusions, this is the exception, rather than the rule. Their tongues are quite pale but we also see characteristic dark purple splotching in the more severe cases – often along the edges. In these situations, we really see that stinging nettles aren’t just a nutritive tonic: they deserve to be considered alongside all the “superfoods” […]

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