Five Ways To Stop Your Sugar Cravings By Aisling Badger, May 24, 2017

eat too much sugar take bitters
sugar cravings stop with bitters

 

What happens if you eat too much sugar?

Sugar is a primary life source, and our bodies require it for energy. The body responds quickly to sugar as a fast-acting fuel. Complex sugars in whole foods offer a balanced response to sustaining our blood sugar as they are most often nutrient-rich, and the energy is obtained by breaking down these foods in our digestive process. Refined sugar is unnatural, and gets used quickly in the body as an efficient boost when we need it most, so sometimes it comes in handy. However, the more we count on it, the more our body craves and depends on it. Sugar also triggers the pleasure hormone, dopamine, which leaves us reaching for more as part of our reward and pleasure system.
While cravings can mean many things—including the need to strengthen the adrenal system, monthly hormonal changes, food sensitivities, etc.—cravings are also directly affected by our diet and lifestyle habits. When our blood sugar is low from lack of carbohydrates, protein or fat (the energy-producing nutrients, we crave sugar to keep ourselves going.
In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) sugar cravings are seen as a a sign of an underlying deficiency. Essentially, we are craving nourishment. Traditionally nourishing and building foods like rice, sweet potatoes, carrots, winter squash, dates, etc. are all sweet in flavor, but also healing and full of substantial nutritional value.

 

How to curb sugar cravings:

 

1. Stabilize your blood sugar

Not only will this support a healthy endocrine (hormonal) system, it takes away the need for sugar […]

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Self-Care for Mindful Mamas By Guest Blogger Jentri Jollimore of Badger Balm, May 5, 2017

Mindful mamas, we see you. You’re protecting and providing for your baby every minute of the day. You’re constantly researching the best for your family. You’re navigating an unsteady world while providing balance for those you care about most. You are a superwoman.  

And if you’re feeling run-down, it’s no wonder! You do a lot.

Resilience

Resilience is defined as the ability to adapt and cope with stressful situations. You can think of resilience like a big jug of water. We dip into this supply of water when any stressful situation arises. The greater the stress, the more “water” we use. So throughout the day, the level of water goes down. And most of the time that jug gets refilled naturally – when we rest, for example.

However, in times of prolonged stress, our level of resilience gets lower and lower. It becomes more difficult to replenish fully, especially when compounded with sleep deprivation. As a result, we feel run-down in addition to being tired.

This is totally normal and happens to almost everyone at one time or another. Even a superwoman. The good news is that you can support your resilience with self-care.

mamas self-care resilience

Self-Care

I think of self-care as a tool to strengthen resilience. Approaching it in this way allows for it to be a priority. For me, the biggest challenge is to shake off the notion that self-care is somehow frivolous; a waste of time that could be better spent knocking things off my to-do list.

But the reality is that you are the only one who can prioritize your self-care. And really, your to-do […]

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Feed Your Microbiome! By Aisling Badger, April 19, 2017

microbiome dandelion root

If you ask an herbalist, they will be sure to tell you that what you put into your body matters, and that digestion is the root of great health. Research suggests that there are over 100 trillion living bacteria organisms, making up a whole ecosystem within our body called the microbiome. We are in some sense more microbiome than we are human, which is to say, we have a greater number of microbes living inside us than we have human genes. Only recently have researchers turned their attention to the intricate microbial relationships at play in our bodies and how our microbiomes affect our moods, skin, and overall health.

A healthy gut has always been one of traditional medicine’s top priorities and is the foundation for great digestion, glowing skin, and a strong, healthy immune system.

Today, having digestive upset or an unbalanced gut is considered almost normal, and is often overlooked. A lack of education within our food system and lack of access to nutritional advice leads to years of diets containing processed foods and loads of sugar; there is also the over-prescription of antibiotics (which kill harmful bacteria, but also the good) to contend with. These recurring situations leave us with all sorts of imbalances in our bodies and show up in ways other than just digestive upset.

microbiome bitter greens harvested

Science is also beginning to study the unique relationship that our gut has with neurotransmitters—the chemical messages in the brain like GABA, serotonin, or dopamine—that can influence anxiety and depression.

Feeding and supporting the gut and its bacteria is age-old knowledge that now has the backing of science, and should be at the forefront of our […]

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Science Update: The Benefits of Gardening By Guido Masé, April 11, 2017

gardening benefits barefoot
Founder Jovial King in her garden (photo from DIY Bitters)

We have all heard that our moods (and even our thoughts) don’t live in our heads. For example, we’ve known for a while that serotonin, an important neurotransmitter that regulates mood, is found in abundance in the GI tract.1 Its role there includes managing mucus production and acid production, as well as – possibly – helping to regulate mood. Serotonin-producing cells in the GI tract, furthermore, seem to need the right signals from our gut flora (the beneficial bacteria that live in our intestines) to function properly,2 which lends additional credence to the notion that our moods are intimately connected to our internal ecologies.

gardening benefits basket

But what of our external ecologies? Is there any evidence that being outside might positively impact our moods? We are, in fact, exploring this connection more and more: from “forest-bathing”, which consistently seems to reduce stress and anxiety,3 to Dr. Andrea Taylor’s work on relieving symptoms of attention deficit by walking in nature

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